June 24, 2017

Gandhi: Quintessentially Different and Non-Digestible

My book (Being Different) brings to the foreground some fundamental differences between Indian and Western civilizations, and explores at length the spiritual, metaphysical, philosophical and historical basis for such differences. I argue, that to gloss over these differences, reveals a dismal lack of civilizational self-awareness and wishful thinking on the part of Westerners, and low self-esteem by Indians resulting in part of an education system that seems to be still fulfilling the mandates of colonial educators.

Dharmic leadership too should be faulted for this when they are disinclined to embark on a serious comparative study of the West and India. Laziness, the loss of the culture of scholarship, research and contemplation that once defined India, superciliousness (“the truth is with us, so why should we study others”) and the sheer challenge of confronting the West are some of the reasons for this. The discomfort and loss of easy Western discipleship that such a study with its resulting assertiveness would bring is another reason for the prevailing “we are all the same” attitude among the retinue of Indian gurus who should know better.  Yet, without the search, serious study and discovery of one’s own authenticity, Indians will remain colonized – in spirit and intellect if not physically. A further travesty is that Indians, blind to and kept from the riches of their heritage, find themselves in the sorry state of flocking to Western appropriators of their legacy, unaware that it is they who really are the proud legatees of that knowledge.

But there are rare exemplars of the power of authenticity and self-knowledge. Mahatma Gandhi, at the height of colonial rule in India, had the audacity to assert his dharmic differences firmly but without chauvinism.  He was steeped in Indian cultural habits and experimented with dharma all his life. Speaking in very simple and precise terms, he managed to alter the course of world history. After abandoning his early experiments to “become a gentleman” in the mould of the Englishmen who ruled over the sub-continent, Gandhi found his own personal liberation in embracing wholeheartedly the manner, lifestyle, dress and idiom of his fellow countrymen. Gandhi understood early on in his life’s work, that India’s independence could be won only after the structures of engagement, the very terms of the discourse between the colonizer and the colonized, were altered and reversed, such that Indians would regain their native intelligence, skills and cultural power. He fought against not only the physical presence of the Europeans in India but their violence against the native religion, language, customs, symbols and way of life of Indian people. These had served historically to nourish, empower and strengthen Indians in their long history. Gandhi once again, wanted to harness this very shakti for the freedom of his people.

As the leader of India’s freedom movement, Gandhi relied greatly on the use of Sanskrit words to give voice to India’s struggle and demands. Words like “satyagraha”, “swadeshi”, “swaraj”, “ahimsa”, “sva-dharma” became an integral part of the lexicon of the Indian freedom struggle. By using these words and not their English equivalents, Gandhi preserved the complete range of their complex meaning, their dharmic origins and their cultural context. Rather than relying on the English language, India’s struggle against the English was expressed in a language that was culturally resonant, making it all the more meaningful and empowering to those engaged in it. Thus, India’s freedom fight wasn’t just a struggle but a “truth-struggle” (“Satya-graha”). Such a truth struggle therefore could have no place for violence (a falsity) but would have to be conducted in a manner that befit the bearers of truth. Moreover, the full meaning of “satya” includes not just the concept of truth but the constant striving for it, something to be aspired for and eternally engaged in. The hyphenation of truth and struggle, seemingly odd perhaps in English to describe an independence movement, is natural when extrapolated from the original Sanskrit language.  “Swaraj” is not just freedom but “self-rule”. By using the term “swaraj”, Gandhi spoke not only for the entire nation’s freedom from British rule but also encompassed the right to self-determination by all of India’s diverse communities, particularly those in rural and agrarian India. Gandhi’s self-rule wasn’t just the rule of the majority but a truly pluralistic self-regulation by all of India’s peoples. To that end, he advocated a traditional, decentralized (“panchayat”) system of governance for India, quite unlike the top-down colonial administration of the British.

Further, the meaning of “swaraj” also includes freedom from the emotions, desires and compulsions that haunt our inner being. Complete “swaraj” was more than political independence and included liberation from one’s psychological bondage. Gandhi always saw India’s freedom struggle as one intertwined with the spiritual struggle of its citizens.

The term “ahimsa” is more than non-violence. “Himsa” translates to “harm” and “ahimsa” is not just non-violence, a narrow and incomplete translation, but more accurately “non-harming”. It wasn’t enough for Gandhi to not physically kill in the freedom struggle. The good fight necessarily precluded all forms of harm – cultural genocide, environmental degradation, animal slaughter and even the psychological humiliation of others. When Gandhi used the term “swadeshi” or “from the soil”, to alter the buying habits of Indians, he meant not only the boycott of English manufactured products, a key weapon of domination in the colonial economy, but also the idea of consuming locally produced goods and seasonal produce. These he saw as critical to maintaining the health and vibrancy of local Indian communities and farmers. Swadeshi also means native frameworks of thinking, native language, dress and a sense of identity.

Gandhi’s life illustrates many key points that I make in my book and in my own personal journey. I continue to draw great inspiration from him. His “purva-paksha” of the West was challenging and audacious. His use of non-translatable Sanskrit words to articulate India’s freedom struggle was a strategic way of managing and owning the discourse surrounding his culture. His way of life demonstrated how differences may be asserted constructively. India’s independence was a historical event of the twentieth century which validated that cultures and civilizations must refuse to let their selfhood get digested by a predator, and that the audacity to be non-digestible must prevail.


July 18, 2008 Washington 061Author Rajiv Malhotra

Born in 1950, Rajiv Malhotra is an Indian American researcher, writer, speaker and public intellectual on current affairs as they relate to civilizations, cross-cultural encounters, religion and science. He studied physics at St. Stephens College in Delhi and went for post-graduate studies in physics and then computer science to the USA. Rajiv served in multiple careers, including: software development executive, Fortune 100 senior corporate executive, strategic consultant, and successful entrepreneur in the information technology and media industries. At the peak of his career when he owned 20 companies in several countries, he took early retirement at age 44 to pursue philanthropy, research and public service. He established Infinity Foundation for this purpose in 1994.

Rajiv has conducted original research in a variety of fields and has influenced many other thinkers in India and the West. He has disrupted the mainstream thought process among academic and non-academic intellectuals alike, by providing fresh provocative positions on Dharma and on India. Some of the focal points of his work are: Interpretation of Dharma for the current times; comparative religion, globalization, and India’s contributions to the world.

He has authored hundreds of articles, provided strategic guidance to numerous organizations and has over 300 video lectures available online. To best understand Rajiv’s  thoughts and contributions, his books are a good resource. Besides Invading the Sacred, in which Rajiv is the main protagonist, he has authored the following game changing books:

Being Different: An Indian Challenge to Western Universalism

Breaking India: Western Interventions in Dravidian and Dalit Faultlines; and

Indra’s Net: Defending Hinduism’s Philosophical Unity

The Battle for Sanskrit: Is Sanskrit Political or Sacred, Oppressive or Liberating, Dead or Alive?

Academic Hinduphobia: A Critique of Wendy Doniger’s Erotic School of Indology

Currently, Rajiv Malhotra is the full-time founder-director of Infinity Foundation in Princeton, NJ. He also serves as Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Center for Indic Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, and is adviser to various organizations.

Infinity Foundation has given more than 400 grants for research, education and community work. It has provided strategic grants to major universities in support of pioneering programs including: visiting professorships in Indic studies at Harvard University, Yoga and Hindi classes at Rutgers University, research and teaching of nondualistic philosophies at University of Hawaii, Global Renaissance Institute and a Center for Buddhist studies at Columbia University, a program in religion and science at University of California, endowment for the Center for Advanced Study of India at University of Pennsylvania, lectures at the Center for Consciousness Studies at University of Arizona.

Rajiv Malhotra inspired the idea of Swadeshi Indology Conference. The first ever Swadeshi Indology Conference was held at IIT, Chennai from July 6 to July 8, 2016. This conference hosted well-researched papers that highlighted the discrepancies and mistranslations in the studies of Indology done by Prof. Sheldon Pollock. This conference is the first of a series of conferences that have been planned to address multiple issues raised by Western Indologists requiring astute examination, analyses and rejoinders, culminating in a published volume with a selection of papers.

 Another major initiative of the Infinity Foundation is the HIST series. The HIST (History of Indian Science and Technology) series is a compilation of multi-Volume History of Indian Science and Technology based only on solid academic scholarship, and not on wild extrapolations. To accomplish this, each volume was subjected to rigorous peer reviews. The following volumes have already been published and printed as part of this IF project:

  1. Marvels of Indian Iron Through the Ages
  2. Indian Zinc Technology in Global Perspective
  3. Water Management and Hydraulic Engineering in India
  4. History of Metals in Eastern India and Bangladesh
  5. Harappan Architecture and Civil Engineering
  6. Beginning of Agriculture and Domestication in India
  7. History of Iron Technology in India
  8. Indian Beads History and Technology
  9. Himalayan Traditional Architecture
  10. Animal Husbandry and Allied Technologies in Ancient India
  11. Harappan Technology and Its Legacy
  12. Reflection on The History of Indian Science and Technology
  13. Chalcolithic South Asia: Aspects of Crafts and Technologies
  14. Traditional Water Management

Rajiv Malhotra has an active Facebook following with about 8 hundred thousand followers.

He also has an online discussion group. He can be followed at:

Facebook: RajivMalhotra.Official
Webwww.RajivMalhotra.com
Twitter: @RajivMessage

Source: http://rajivmalhotra.com/library/articles/gandhi-quintessentially-different-non-digestible/

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About Rajiv Malhotra 32 Articles
Author Rajiv Malhotra Born in 1950, Rajiv Malhotra is an Indian American researcher, writer, speaker and July 18, 2008 Washington 061public intellectual on current affairs as they relate to civilizations, cross-cultural encounters, religion and science. He studied physics at St. Stephens College in Delhi and went for post-graduate studies in physics and then computer science to the USA. Rajiv served in multiple careers, including: software development executive, Fortune 100 senior corporate executive, strategic consultant, and successful entrepreneur in the information technology and media industries. At the peak of his career when he owned 20 companies in several countries, he took early retirement at age 44 to pursue philanthropy, research and public service. He established Infinity Foundation for this purpose in 1994. Rajiv has conducted original research in a variety of fields and has influenced many other thinkers in India and the West. He has disrupted the mainstream thought process among academic and non-academic intellectuals alike, by providing fresh provocative positions on Dharma and on India. Some of the focal points of his work are: Interpretation of Dharma for the current times; comparative religion, globalization, and India’s contributions to the world. He has authored hundreds of articles, provided strategic guidance to numerous organizations and has over 300 video lectures available online. To best understand Rajiv’s thoughts and contributions, his books are a good resource. Besides Invading the Sacred, in which Rajiv is the main protagonist, he has authored the following game changing books: Being Different: An Indian Challenge to Western Universalism Breaking India: Western Interventions in Dravidian and Dalit Faultlines; and Indra’s Net: Defending Hinduism’s Philosophical Unity The Battle for Sanskrit: Is Sanskrit Political or Sacred, Oppressive or Liberating, Dead or Alive? Academic Hinduphobia: A Critique of Wendy Doniger’s Erotic School of Indology Currently, Rajiv Malhotra is the full-time founder-director of Infinity Foundation in Princeton, NJ. He also serves as Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Center for Indic Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, and is adviser to various organizations. Infinity Foundation has given more than 400 grants for research, education and community work. It has provided strategic grants to major universities in support of pioneering programs including: visiting professorships in Indic studies at Harvard University, Yoga and Hindi classes at Rutgers University, research and teaching of nondualistic philosophies at University of Hawaii, Global Renaissance Institute and a Center for Buddhist studies at Columbia University, a program in religion and science at University of California, endowment for the Center for Advanced Study of India at University of Pennsylvania, lectures at the Center for Consciousness Studies at University of Arizona. Rajiv Malhotra inspired the idea of Swadeshi Indology Conference. The first ever Swadeshi Indology Conference was held at IIT, Chennai from July 6 to July 8, 2016. This conference hosted well-researched papers that highlighted the discrepancies and mistranslations in the studies of Indology done by Prof. Sheldon Pollock. This conference is the first of a series of conferences that have been planned to address multiple issues raised by Western Indologists requiring astute examination, analyses and rejoinders, culminating in a published volume with a selection of papers. Another major initiative of the Infinity Foundation is the HIST series. The HIST (History of Indian Science and Technology) series is a compilation of multi-Volume History of Indian Science and Technology based only on solid academic scholarship, and not on wild extrapolations. To accomplish this, each volume was subjected to rigorous peer reviews. The following volumes have already been published and printed as part of this IF project: Marvels of Indian Iron Through the Ages Indian Zinc Technology in Global Perspective Water Management and Hydraulic Engineering in India History of Metals in Eastern India and Bangladesh Harappan Architecture and Civil Engineering Beginning of Agriculture and Domestication in India History of Iron Technology in India Indian Beads History and Technology Himalayan Traditional Architecture Animal Husbandry and Allied Technologies in Ancient India Harappan Technology and Its Legacy Reflection on The History of Indian Science and Technology Chalcolithic South Asia: Aspects of Crafts and Technologies Traditional Water Management Rajiv Malhotra has an active Facebook following with about 8 hundred thousand followers.
  • Krishna

    Mahatma Gandhi personally might be a great man. Was he the main reason for India’s independence? Did he win freedom for India? I doubt it. But of course, he did his best.

    Britain had tough time defending itself against the onslaught of German war machine during Second World War, and but for American and Soviet powers, Germany could have subjugated Britain. The Britain who had tough time defending itself can no longer hold on to the colonies.

    The period of decolonisation started at about the time of Second World War. It is not just Britain who had to withdraw from the occupied colonies, it happened to other European powers such as Franch, Spanish and Dutch.

    If Gandhi was the reason for India’s independence, why did it not occur sooner, Gandhi was asking for Swaraj for very many years before Second World War. It is weakening of Britain and other European powers and many indigenous freedom fighters that led to independence of India as well as many other colonized countries. None of those countries had a world known leader such as Gandhi.

    Gandhi actually supported Britain during Second World War leading to death and suffering of many Indian soldiers. I understand Hitler was not a decent individual and it is a different topic. I do not, but some of historians know the number of Indians killed during world wars as well as Indians killed by colonisers.

    Irrespective of whether Gandhi was there or not, colonisation can not go on forever.